Weekly outline

  • Welcome back to Mr. Dale's Lang/Lit Course! Now in the shiny new Grade 12 edition.
    I'm glad you're here. 

    I'll use this Moodle page to post deadlines, assignments, and links to handy notes & supplemental readings for the class. Please check the page regularly, as it will help you stay on top of your tasks. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to email me at rdale@aischool.org.
  • August 11-14

    OVERVIEW
    • This first week, we'll share summer stories, get a sense of Part 2 & Year 2, discuss the summer reading, and start our discussion of Journalism's role in modern society.
    BIG IDEAS
     
    • This is your graduation year. Time to get serious.
    • Part 2 is about reading and analyzing the news and the way current events are presented to us... and how our understanding of the world is influenced by the language and images used in the news.
    • Journalism is a key part of democracy. Ideally, it empowers the common people with knowledge so they can make better decisions in business, politics, and more. It also monitors the powerful, exposing them when they abuse their power.
    • Unfortunately, Journalism is imperfect because people are imperfect. Journalists can get their facts wrong, choose the entertaining story over the informative one, bias their reporting, and much more. At the same time, consumers of Journalism are also part of the problem. Like Gladstone said, "We get the media we deserve."
     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
    • By your second class, complete the News Survey.
    • By your third class, read the chapter from America: The Book and complete the reading questions.
    • By August 28th, submit your Summer Reading Essay WITH TEXTUAL EVIDENCE & WORKS CITED.
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    • MONDAY: No class. 
    • TUESDAY: E BLOCK: Share summer stories. Read course description and look at overview of Year 2. Graffiti brainstorm about connections between summer reading texts. Look over summer reading assignment task sheet.  
    • WEDNESDAY: G BLOCK: Share summer stories. Read course description and look at overview of Year 2. Graffiti brainstorm about connections between summer reading texts. Look over summer reading assignment task sheet.  
    •  
    • THURSDAY: E & G BLOCK: Discuss news survey results. View and discuss passages from Amusing Ourselves to DeathThe Medium is the Massage/Message
    •  
    • FRIDAY: G BLOCK: Discuss passages from America: The Book on Journalism and intro Citizen Kane.
  • August 17-21

    OVERVIEW
    • This week, we'll continue our discussion of journalism's role in society and the problems inherent in reporting "The Truth." To do this, we'll look at one of the greatest films of all time, the story of Citizen Kane, a tragedy about a newsman who makes himself the story, a reporter of truth who quickly becomes a creator of fictions.
    BIG IDEAS
     
    • This is your graduation year. Time to get serious.
    • Part 2 is about reading and analyzing the news and the way current events are presented to us... and how our understanding of the world is influenced by the language and images used in the news.
    • Journalism is a key part of democracy. Ideally, it empowers the common people with knowledge so they can make better decisions in business, politics, and more. It also monitors the powerful, exposing them when they abuse their power.
    • Unfortunately, Journalism is imperfect because people are imperfect. Journalists can get their facts wrong, choose the entertaining story over the informative one, bias their reporting, and much more. At the same time, consumers of Journalism are also part of the problem. Like Gladstone said, "We get the media we deserve."
    • Remember that tragedies focus around a great hero who goes too far in pursuit of greatness, who is destroyed by an enemy, bad luck, and bad choices.
    • Kane starts off as a news reporter, but he quickly succeeds through Yellow Journalism. However, this same twisting of the truth ultimately backfires on Kane, and his downfall suggests the dangers inherent in twisting the truth.
    • However, our search to know "the real Kane" is also a dangerous one. After all, Kane is dead when the story begins, and everything we hear about him comes from biased witness, those who loved or hated him--therefore, it is impossible to ever know the complete truth about Charles Foster Kane.
     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
    • By August 19th, send me your Summer Reading Essay outline.
    • By August 28th, submit your Summer Reading Essay WITH TEXTUAL EVIDENCE & WORKS CITED.
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    • MONDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Begin watching Citizen Kane.
    • TUESDAY: No class.
    • WEDNESDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Finish Citizen Kane.

     

    • THURSDAY: E BLOCK: Complete Citizen Kane discussion. Begin group practice FOA on Kane.

     

    • FRIDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Complete Citizen Kane discussion. Begin group practice FOA on Kane.
  • 25 August - 31 August

    OVERVIEW
    In week 3, you'll turn in your summer reading essays on Monday, deliver your first FOA-practice presentations, and then begin researching who different news agencies belong to and how they influence news agencies to spin the news.
    BIG IDEAS
     
    • All news has spin and is influenced by governments, parent companies, shareholders, and advertisers.
    • Rather than always presenting news, agencies often deliver spin and theater because it is entertaining to viewers and therefore increases ratings.
    • The focus on "argument culture" and spin abandons the purpose of informing the public in favor of increased ratings.
     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     
    • August 24-26th: Practice FOA on Citizen Kane due
    • By August 28th, submit your Summer Reading Essay WITH TEXTUAL EVIDENCE & WORKS CITED.
    • Practice FOA on "Who owns your news?" will be delivered on 9/11.
      • Choose a major news agency and find who owns them, how they tend to spin the news, how often they use argument-style shows, shiny animations, etc.
        • Fox - Tadeo/Bonnie?

        • CBS

        • MSNBC -

        • BBC - Shona/Lexi/Nan

        • Al-Jazeera - James/Haris

        • Satirical News: The Daily Show, The Nightly Report, or Last Week Tonight - Bruno/Dimitrios, Chancity

        • Public News: NPR or PBS - Sean/Iain

        • CNN -

        • Buzzfeed - Bella/Maddie
        • TimesNOW - Sid/Shreyas

     

     
    THE DAILY BRIEF
     
    • TUESDAY: G BLOCK: Prepare practice FOA Citizen Kane presentations.
     
    • THURSDAY: G BLOCK: Work on network research. 
     
    • FRIDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Turn in summer reading essays. Continue network research.

    POSSIBLE TEXTS:

  • 8 September - 14 September

    OVERVIEW

    Now that you're "back" from Field Trip week, you'll continue researching who different news agencies belong to and how they influence news agencies to spin the news.

    BIG IDEAS
     
    • All news has spin and is influenced by governments, parent companies, shareholders, and advertisers.
    • Rather than always presenting news, agencies often deliver spin and theater because it is entertaining to viewers and therefore increases ratings.
    • The focus on "argument culture" and spin abandons the purpose of informing the public in favor of increased ratings.
     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     
    • By 9/14: Turn in an outline and bibliography for your Practice FOA so I can see your progress.
    • Practice FOA on "Who owns your news?" will be delivered on 9/16.
      • Choose a major news agency and find who owns them, how they tend to spin the news, how often they use argument-style shows, shiny animations, etc.
        • Fox - Tadeo/Bonnie?

        • CBS

        • MSNBC -

        • BBC - Shona/Lexi/Nan

        • Al-Jazeera - James/Haris

        • Satirical News: The Daily Show, The Nightly Report, or Last Week Tonight - Bruno/Dimitrios, Chancity

        • Public News: NPR or PBS - Sean/Iain

        • CNN -

        • Buzzfeed - Bella/Maddie
        • TimesNOW - Sid/Shreyas

     

     
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    • MONDAY: No class. 

     

    • TUESDAY: No class
     
     

    POSSIBLE TEXTS:

  • 15 September - 21 September

    OVERVIEW

    This week, you'll finalize and deliver your News Network FOAs. With any time left over, we'll begin our final mini-unit in Part 2: E-Journalism and the Future of News.

    BIG IDEAS
     
    • All news has spin and is influenced by governments, parent companies, shareholders, and advertisers.
    • Rather than always presenting news, agencies often deliver spin and theater because it is entertaining to viewers and therefore increases ratings.
    • The focus on "argument culture" and spin abandons the purpose of informing the public in favor of increased ratings.
    • E-Journalism is putting ink-and-paper news out of business, and the changing technology has resulted in changing news--both in terms of format and content. Hey, Twitter, we're looking at you.
    • E-Journalism and the "Fifth Estate" has potential benefits, such as the creation of "citizen journalists" who can not only be informed and empowered at lightning pace, but also share knowledge themselves.
    • However, E-Journalism also has problems aplenty when it comes to ensuring professional-grade, accurate, ethical reporting. Plus the need for ad traffic means a relentless pursuit of buzz. And so the problem of what gets reported and why becomes an even bigger problem.
     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     
    • Practice FOA on "Who owns your news?" will be delivered on 9/16.
      • Choose a major news agency and find who owns them, how they tend to spin the news, how often they use argument-style shows, shiny animations, etc.
    • By 9/18 G Block & 9/22 E Block: Read "Fast, Loud, & Mostly True: Inside the Buzz-Fueled Media Startups Battling for Your Attention" and write a response:
      • Write one paragraph about the positive benefits you see in E-Journalism, based on what you've seen in the article
      • Write one paragraph about the negative effects of E-journalism, based on what you've seen in the article 
    • By 9/24: Read your choice of articles about E-Journalism & "Movie Journalism" at work. Then write a paragraph about how this example shows the positives and negatives of E-Journalism at work.
     
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    • MONDAY: E BLOCK: Work day! 

     

    • TUESDAY: G BLOCK: Work day!
    • WEDNESDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Present practice FOAs.
     
    • THURSDAY: G BLOCK: Present FOAs.
     
    • FRIDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Finish FOAs. Begin reading "Fast, Loud, and Mostly True."
  • September 20 - September 25

    OVERVIEW
    • This week, we'll conclude our discussion of Journalism & Mass Communication by looking at the ways E-Journalism is changing not only the news business, but the way we think about the world.
    BIG IDEAS
     
    • Journalism is supposed to produce an informed public better able to make wise economic, political, social, and personal choices. It is also supposed to serve as a watchdog on those in power. However, traditional journalism is often criticized because it is always "the truth" through a filter of one network or another.
    • E-journalism holds the potential to make anyone a reporter and truthseeker. With instant communication, everything can be fact-checked and shared. But e-journalism can also speed up the spread of inaccuracies and outright lies.
    • In a similar way, "docu-dramas" like The Social Network, The Fifth Estate, & Zero Dark Thirty allow film-makers to report on current (or very recent) events in a gripping way, using the fictional techniques of cinema to bring stories to life and inform the audience about the problems that face our world. But there's a big difference between making a movie like Lincoln and W. One was about the life of Abe Lincoln, made long after he was dead and after historians had a chance to see the long-term effects of his choices. The other was about the still-alive (and still in office at that point) George W. Bush. Any time real-world stories are woven into a narrative form, film-makers invariably color our reading of real-world events, making people and events seem evil or heroic...often long before the dust has settled.

     

     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     
    • By 9/24: read your choice of E-journalism articles from the list and write your 1-paragraph response.
    • By 9/25: Complete your FOA proposal form.
    • By 9/30: Submit your Bibliography of research.
    • FOAs due 10/15 - 10/21.
     
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    • MONDAY: No class.
     
    • TUESDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Discuss the positives and negatives of E-journalism, based on the articles read.
    • WEDNESDAY: E BLOCK: Finish E-journalism discussion. FOA brainstorm session.
    • THURSDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Finish E-journalism discussion. FOA brainstorm session.
     
    • FRIDAY: E BLOCK: Research time.
     
  • 29 September - 5 October

    OVERVIEW

    • This week, we'll review how to approach the Paper 1 and write a practice version before heading out on break.
    BIG IDEAS
     
    • The Paper 1 requires you to analyze the author, audience, purpose, and stylistic devices of a text...and don't forget to prove your points with specific evidence and consider the effect on the reader!

     

     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     
    • By 9/30: Submit your Bibliography of research.
    • FOAs due 10/15 - 10/21.
     
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    • MONDAY: G BLOCK: How do we write a Paper 1?
     
    • TUESDAY: No class
    • WEDNESDAY: E BLOCK: How do we write a Paper 1?
    • THURSDAY: G BLOCK: Write a practice Paper 1.
     
    • FRIDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Write a practice Paper 1.
  • October 11 - October 16

    OVERVIEW
    • Welcome back from Fall Break! This week, as you work on your FOAs at home, you'll start concocting a Written Task 1 idea for after the FOAs.
    BIG IDEAS
     
    • Journalism is supposed to produce an informed public better able to make wise economic, political, social, and personal choices. It is also supposed to serve as a watchdog on those in power. However, traditional journalism is often criticized because it is always "the truth" through a filter of one network or another.
    • E-journalism holds the potential to make anyone a reporter and truthseeker. With instant communication, everything can be fact-checked and shared. But e-journalism can also speed up the spread of inaccuracies and outright lies.
    • In a similar way, "docu-dramas" like The Social Network, The Fifth Estate, Zero Dark Thirty allow film-makers to report on current (or very recent) events in a gripping way, using the fictional techniques of cinema to bring stories to life and inform the audience about the problems that face our world. But there's a big difference between making a movie like Lincoln and W. One was about the life of Abe Lincoln, made long after he was dead and after historians had a chance to see the long-term effects of his choices. The other was about the still-alive (and still in office at that point) George W. Bush. Any time real-world stories are woven into a narrative form, film-makers invariably color our reading of real-world events, making people and events seem evil or heroic...often long before the dust has settled.
    • A good Written Task 1 shows what you know through an example you make yourself, and it starts with a rationale that explains to the IB exactly how your Task 1 shows what you know.

     

     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     
    • FOAs due 10/15 - 10/21.
    • Written Task 1 due 11/13.
    • HL Only: Written Task 2 due 12/3.
     
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    • MONDAY: No class.
     
    • TUESDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: What's a Written Task 1 again? And how do I write a good one for Part 2?

    • WEDNESDAY: E BLOCK: Read over sample WT1s. Brainstorm an original idea.
    • THURSDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: FOAs
     
    • FRIDAY: E BLOCK: FOA presentations

  • October 19 - October 23

    OVERVIEW
    • This week, you'll finish presenting FOAs and start discussing the Six Forms of Literary Criticism you're expected to know about in Part 3 of the Course.
    BIG IDEAS
     
    • A good Written Task 1 shows what you know through an example you make yourself, and it starts with a rationale that explains to the IB exactly how your Task 1 shows what you know.
    • There are actually numerous "right" ways to read a text. In this course, we will focus on six schools of literary criticism: Formalist, Historical-Biographical, Reader-Response, Feminist, Marxist, and Psychoanalytical.

     

     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     
    • FOAs due 10/15 - 10/21.
    • Written Task 1 due 11/13.
    • HL Only: Written Task 2 due 12/3.
     
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    • MONDAY: G BLOCK: FOAs.
     
    • TUESDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: FOAs.

    • WEDNESDAY: G BLOCK: FOAs.
    • THURSDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Intro to the 6 Forms of Literary Criticism...as seen in Fairy Tales.
     
    • FRIDAY: No class
  • November 2 - November 6

    OVERVIEW
    • This week, we'll practice analyzing a variety of short texts using the Six Forms of Literary Criticism you're expected to know about in Part 3 of the Course. By midweek, we'll switch over to learning about some of the ways to analyze a comic book as literature. Then we'll start learning about the history of Iran to prep for reading Persepolis.
    BIG IDEAS
     
    • A good Written Task 1 shows what you know through an example you make yourself, and it starts with a rationale that explains to the IB exactly how your Task 1 shows what you know.
    • There are actually numerous "right" ways to read a text. In this course, we will focus on six schools of literary criticism: Formalist, Historical-Biographical, Reader-Response, Feminist, Marxist, and Psychoanalytical.

     

     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     
    • Written Task 1 due 11/13.
    • HL Only: Written Task 2 due 12/3.
     
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    • MONDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Partner analysis of "The School" and "The Glass Mountain." Read and TRY to analyze some poetry by William Carlos Williams and Wallace Stevens.
     
    • TUESDAY: G BLOCK: Read passages from "Understanding Comics."

    • WEDNESDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Read passages from "Understanding Comics." Apply what you've learned to passages from a variety of comics.
    • THURSDAY: No class.
     
    • FRIDAY: Apply what you've learned to passages from a variety of comics. Start looking over "History of Iran" powerpoint.
  • 3 November - 9 November

    OVERVIEW
    • This week, we'll learn about the history of Iran to prep for reading Persepolis. Then we'll begin reading the text itself, keeping an eye out for literary elements to expound upon in the May Paper 2.
    BIG IDEAS
     
    • A good Written Task 1 shows what you know through an example you make yourself, and it starts with a rationale that explains to the IB exactly how your Task 1 shows what you know.
    • There are actually numerous "right" ways to read a text. In this course, we will focus on six schools of literary criticism: Formalist, Historical-Biographical, Reader-Response, Feminist, Marxist, and Psychoanalytical.
    • The history of Iran is a complicated one, a muddle of Western imperialism, socialist Marxism, and Islamic fundamentalism. Post-colonial criticism is definitely a force in play. 

     

     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     
    • Written Task 1 due 11/13.
    • HL Only: Written Task 2 due 12/3.
     
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    • MONDAY: E BLOCK: Prior Knowledge Building on Iranian History.
     
    • TUESDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Prior Knowledge Building on Iranian History.

    • WEDNESDAY: E BLOCK: Finish Prior Knowledge Building. Recap on Rationale Writing. Overview of Persepolis reading questions.
    • THURSDAY: G BLOCK: Finish Prior Knowledge Building. Recap on Rationale Writing. Overview of Persepolis reading questions.
     
    • FRIDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Turn in Written Task 1. HL only: Discuss expectations for Written Task 2.
  • 1 December - 7 December

    OVERVIEW
    • This week, you'll finish reading Persepolis. You may choose to work in small groups or solo as you proceed through the text.
    BIG IDEAS
     
    • There are actually numerous "right" ways to read a text. In this course, we will focus on six schools of literary criticism: Formalist, Historical-Biographical, Reader-Response, Feminist, Marxist, and Psychoanalytical.
    • Graphic novels & comic books can be fluff, but they can also be great literature--just like movies or books. To understand a graphic novel, you need to understand not just all the textual elements of literary devices, you also need to be able to read the images (the panel-to-panel transitions, the use of emotive lines, the tension between the realistic and the cartoonish, etc.). Being able to do this will help you understand Persepolis AND score big points on the Exam Paper 2.

    • Persepolis is a coming-of-age story, and Marjane's tumultuous adolescence goes hand in hand with the tumultuous changes that Iran saw in the 1970s. The story uses both an older, wise narrator and a young, idealistic, and naive protagonist (Marjane's older and younger self). Both the childish protagonist and the apparently simplistic artwork help Satrapi express this traumatic story.

     

     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     
    • ALL STUDENTS: Finish Persepolis and complete reading questions by December 7th.
    • HL STUDENTS: WT2 essay due by December 7th.
     
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    • MONDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Share Thanksgiving break stories. Discuss deadlines. Take class survey. Reading & discussion time.
     
    • TUESDAY: E BLOCK: Reading & discussion time.

    • WEDNESDAY: G BLOCK: Reading & discussion time.
    • THURSDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Reading & discussion time.
     
    • FRIDAY: G BLOCK: Reading & discussion time.
  • 8 December - 14 December

    OVERVIEW
    • This week, you'll discuss Persepolis, meet with one of Marjane Satrapi's classmates, and prepare to tackle a Practice Exam Paper 2 about the text.
    BIG IDEAS
     
    • There are actually numerous "right" ways to read a text. In this course, we will focus on six schools of literary criticism: Formalist, Historical-Biographical, Reader-Response, Feminist, Marxist, and Psychoanalytical.
    • Graphic novels & comic books can be fluff, but they can also be great literature--just like movies or books. To understand a graphic novel, you need to understand not just all the textual elements of literary devices, you also need to be able to read the images (the panel-to-panel transitions, the use of emotive lines, the tension between the realistic and the cartoonish, etc.). Being able to do this will help you understand Persepolis AND score big points on the Exam Paper 2.

    • Persepolis is a coming-of-age story, and Marjane's tumultuous adolescence goes hand in hand with the tumultuous changes that Iran saw in the 1970s. The story uses both an older, wise narrator and a young, idealistic, and naive protagonist (Marjane's older and younger self). Both the childish protagonist and the apparently simplistic artwork help Satrapi express this traumatic story.

     

     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     
    • ALL STUDENTS: Finish Persepolis and complete reading questions by December 7th.
    • HL STUDENTS: WT2 essay due by December 7th. 
     
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    • MONDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Persepolis Socratic Discussion
     
    • TUESDAY: No class

    • WEDNESDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Begin prepping for Practice Exam Paper 2. Interview with Mrs. Memar (E Block only!)
    • THURSDAY: E BLOCK: Prep for Practice Exam Paper 2.
     
    • FRIDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Prep for Practice Exam Paper 2.
  • 15 December - 21 December

    OVERVIEW
    This week, we'll finish writing a practice Exam Paper 2 using your notes from last week and then kick back and watch some of the Persepolis movie before heading out on break.
    BIG IDEAS
     

    Graphic novels & comic books can be fluff, but they can also be great literature--just like movies or books. To understand a graphic novel, you need to understand not just all the textual elements of literary devices, you also need to be able to read the images (the panel-to-panel transitions, the use of emotive lines, the tension between the realistic and the cartoonish, etc.). Being able to do this will help you understand Persepolis AND score big points on the Exam Paper 2.

    Persepolis is a coming-of-age story, and Marjane's tumultuous adolescence goes hand in hand with the tumultuous changes that Iran saw in the 1970s. The story uses both an older, wise narrator and a young, idealistic, and naive protagonist (Marjane's older and younger self). Both the childish protagonist and the apparently simplistic artwork help Satrapi express this traumatic story.

    A text can be analyzed through many lenses, including Reader-Response, Historical-Autobiographical, Formalism, Marxism, Feminism, and Psychoanalysis.

     

     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     
     
     
    THE DAILY BRIEF
    MONDAY: E Block: Watch Persepolis.

    TUESDAY: G Block: Watch Persepolis.
     
    WEDNESDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Holiday party and view Part 2 of Persepolis. (G Block visit with Mrs. Memar)
  • April 18 - April 22

    OVERVIEW
    This week, all students must attend. It's time to prep for the final exams.
    BIG IDEAS

    • Author, Audience, Purpose, & Stylistic Devices! A successful Paper 1 analyzes a text for its purpose & the stylistic devices that support that purpose...as well as how its author and intended audience have influenced it. 
    • Paper 1 essays should not make value judgements about whether or not the text is a good text or how well it achieves its purpose.
    • A successful Paper 2 essay compares 2 or 3 of our Part 3 texts in regards to a previously unseen question poised by the IB. It must show a clear understanding of the texts you write about & their contexts, a clear insight into the fine points of the question, and a good grasp of the stylistic devices in the works.
    • You must provide a decent amount of background information when explaining your texts, but don't rewrite the book. In other words, briefly explain who Prospero is before you start talking about what he does in the play, but don't retell his complete life story.
    • Be sure to clearly explain your ideas. Don't just say, "Persepolis includes elements of trauma literature." This will score you no points unless you first explain what trauma literature IS and what specific stylistic elements of trauma literature are in this text.

     

     
    MAJOR DEADLINES
     

    SL: 2 Practice Papers due Tuesday.

    HL: The Awakening portfolios due April 21st.

    THE DAILY BRIEF
    MONDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Finish Awakening discussion.

    TUESDAY: E BLOCK: Read over sample Paper 2, Paper 2 prep
     
    WEDNESDAY: BOTH BLOCKS: Read over sample Paper 2, Paper 2 prep
     
    THURSDAY: E BLOCK: Paper 2 review.
     
    FRIDAY: No class. Happy senior day!

  • 27 April - 3 May

    HL & SL: Exam review all week!

    Please feel free to come to room 201 during the following times this week to review for the exam:

    • MONDAY - 4/25 - 11:35-12:35, 2:15-3:15
    • TUESDAY - 4/26 - 8:15-9:15
    • WEDNESDAY - 4/27 - 10:35-11:35
    • THURSDAY - No meetings
    • FRIDAY - 4/29 - 9:15-10:15, 11:35-12:35

    If you plan on coming, please RSVP using this Google Doc to let me know to expect you--feel free to request what exactly I can prepare to help you!

    Click here to complete the anonymous class survey and tell me what I can do to improve the class for next year's Lang-Lit students. 

  • 1 June - 7 June

    You're outta here! Good luck in college and beyond!