Topic outline

  • CREATIVITY, ACTIVITY & SERVICE

    • Creativity is interpreted broadly to include a wide range of arts activities as well as the creativity students demonstrate in designing and implementing service projects.
    • Activity can include not only participation in individual and team sports but also taking part in expeditions and in local or international projects.
    • Service encompasses a host of community and social service activities. Some examples include helping children with special needs, visiting hospitals and working with refugees or homeless people.

    Learning outcomes

    As a result of their CAS experience as a whole, including their reflections, there should be evidence of the following:l

    1. Identify own strengths and develop areas for growth

    2. Demonstrate that challenges have been undertaken, developing new skills in the process

    3. Demonstrate how to initiate and plan a CAS experience

    4. Show commitment to and perseverance in CAS experiences

    5. Demonstrate the skills and recognize the benefits of working collaboratively

    6. Demonstrate engagement with issues of global significance

    7. Recognize and consider the ethics of choices and actions

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  • CAS EVENTS/CAS GROUPS Student Leader Info

     Start a new CAS group or plan an Event 

    All students: FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS & STEPS ON FORMS BELOW TO GET PROPER  APPROVAL

  • CAS PROJECT REQUIREMENTS Grade 11 & 12

    HOW DO I COMPLETE MY CAS PROJECT?

  • CAS AT A GLANCE: 7 LO

    CAS AT A GLANCE: 7 LO- LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • REFLECTIONS

    Students should document their CAS activities, noting in particular their reflections upon their experiences. Documentation may take many forms, including weblogs, illustrated displays and videos, and written notes. Its extent should match the significance of the particular activity to the student.

     

    Guiding reflection questions

     

    Basic reflection

     

    • What did I plan to do?

    • What did I do?

    • What were the outcomes, for me, the team I was working with, and others?

     

    Developing reflection

     

    Moving on from the “What …?” questions outlined earlier, experiential learners might consider, where

    appropriate, for themselves and others, and for each stage of an activity (before, during and after):

     

    • how they felt

    • what they perceived

    • what they thought about the activity

    • what the activity meant to them

    • what the value of the activity was

    • what they learned from the activity and how this learning (for example, a change of perspective)

    might apply more widely.

     

  • ACTION: SPORTS at AIS

    SPORTS 

  • FACULTY & STAFF INFO

    Advisor vs. CAS supervisor